Triumph For Women | Multivitamin

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We just . . . wait for it . . . give you your money back. Holy moo cows. And that means you can say "yes" now and decide later.

Why International Bestselling Author Mike Matthews Created Triumph

Want to plug nutritional “holes” that are common in most people’s diets, including those who eat plenty of “healthy” foods?

Looking to boost your intake of essential vitamins and minerals that improve health and wellness at higher doses?

Interested in natural substances that can improve your body and mind but are difficult or impossible to obtain from food?

If so, you want Triumph.

It’s a 100% natural sport multivitamin that enhances health, mood, and libido Triumph for Women contains 22 essential vitamins and minerals and 11 herbs, amino acids, and plant extracts, which together improve wellbeing, libido, immune function, blood glucose control, heart health, and more. , and reduces stress, inflammation, and anxiety Triumph for Women contains 11 herbs, amino acids, and plant extracts such as alpha-lipoic acid, maca, vitex agnus-castus, and CoQ10, which together boost mood, cognition, and energy levels and reduce stress, inflammation, and cortisol levels. .

The reason Triumph is so effective is simple:

Every ingredient is backed by peer-reviewed scientific research Every active ingredient in Triumph for Women is supported by high-quality scientific studies demonstrating efficacy in healthy humans. and is included at clinically effective levels Every dose of every active ingredient in Triumph for Women is at a clinically effective level, which is the exact amount shown to be safe and effective in peer-reviewed scientific research. .

So, if you want to improve your mental and physical health and performance and boost your resistance to stress, dysfunction, and disease . . . you want to try Triumph today.

You won’t be disappointed.

In fact, if you don’t absolutely love Triumph, just let us know and we’ll give you a full refund on the spot If you don't absolutely love Triumph for Women for whatever reason, you get a prompt and courteous refund. No forms to fill out or hoops to jump through. That means you can say "yes" now and decide later. . No form or return necessary.

You really can’t lose, so order now, and try Triumph risk-free and see if it’s for you.

Notice to California Consumers

WARNING: Consuming this product can expose you to chemicals including lead which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov/food.

See how Legion compares to the rest.

  • Active Ingredients
  • Vitamins K1 and K2
  • Folate as 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate
  • Vitamin B12 as Methylcobalamin
  • Vitex Agnus-Castus (Chasteberry)
  • CoQ10
  • Maca Extract
  • 100% Natural Ingredients
  • Lab Tested
  • Labdoor Certified Product
  • Price Per Serving
  • Legion
    Triumph

    Triumph
  • 2,196 mg
    per serving
  • 600 mcg
    per serving
  • 200 mcg
    per serving
  • 600 mcg
    per serving
  • 63 mg
    per serving
  • 120 mg
    per serving
  • 500 mg
    per serving
  • True
  • True
  • True
  • $
  • Vita
    JYM

    Vita
  • 1,157 mg
    per serving
  • 120 mcg
    per serving
  • False
  • False
  • False
  • False
  • False
  • False
  • Question Mark
  • False
  • $0.83
  • PEScience
    TruMulti

    TruMulti
  • 1,325 mg
    per serving
  • 120 mcg
    per serving
  • False
  • 2.4 mcg
    per serving
  • False
  • False
  • False
  • False
  • Question Mark
  • False
  • $0.83
  • Optimum Nutrition
    Opti-Women

    Opti-Women
  • 1,017 mg
    per serving
  • 80 mcg
    per serving
  • False
  • False
  • 50 mg
    per serving
  • False
  • False
  • False
  • Question Mark
  • False
  • $0.42
Natural Ingredients
100% Natural Ingredients

Triumph doesn’t just “contain natural ingredients”—every ingredient is naturally sourced. We don’t use artificial or synthetic substances of any kind.

Science-Backed Ingredients
Science-Backed Ingredients

Every ingredient in Triumph is backed by peer-reviewed scientific research demonstrating clear benefits in healthy humans.

Clinically Effective Doses
Clinically Effective Doses

Every ingredient in Triumph is included at clinically effective levels, which are the exact amounts shown to be safe and effective in peer-reviewed scientific research.

Lab Tested
Lab Tested

Triumph is tested by third-party labs for heavy metals, microbes, allergens, and other contaminants to ensure it meets FDA purity standards.

Made in USA
Made in USA

Triumph is proudly made in America in NSF-certified and FDA-inspected facilities in accordance with the Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) regulations.

100% Money-Back-Guarantee
100% Money-Back-Guarantee

If you don't absolutely love Triumph, you get a prompt and courteous refund. No forms or returns necessary.

Ingredients & Directions

Triumph Supplement Facts Triumph Supplement Facts

Directions

Take 4 capsules, two times daily, with meals. For optimal results, take every day.

Warning

Check with a qualified healthcare professional before using this product if you are under 18 years of age or if you have any known or suspected medical condition(s) and/or are taking any prescription or OTC medication(s).

KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. STORE IN A COOL, DRY PLACE. DO NOT USE IF SAFETY SEAL IS BROKEN OR MISSING.

Ingredients (2,196 milligrams per serving)

22 Essential Vitamins and Minerals (623 milligrams per serving)

Triumph contains clinically effective doses of 22 vitamins and minerals that are vital for health, performance, and wellbeing, including those often overlooked or under-dosed in other multivitamins like vitamin K1, K2, and D, and zinc, magnesium, iodine, and chromium.

Vitamins-Minerals

Alpha-Lipoic Acid (90 milligrams per serving)

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is a molecule produced by the body and found in several foods, including yeast, liver, kidney, spinach, broccoli, and potatoes. It acts as an antioxidant and can increase the activity of other antioxidants by influencing a protein known as Nrf2.[1]

Research shows that supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid supports levels of an antioxidant known as glutathione in the body, which occurs in all cells and is a primary defense against oxidative damage.[2][3]

It’s also known to support mitochondrial function and can improve the function of neurons in those with diabetes.[4][5][6]

The clinically effective dose of ALA is between 400 and 600 milligrams for improving diabetic neuropathy.

We chose to include 90 milligrams per serving because although it’s not enough to treat diabetic neuropathy, that wasn’t our intention. Instead, we wanted to include ALA to provide general health benefits as well as amplify the effects of CoQ10, which is also in Triumph, and 90 milligrams accomplishes this.

Alpha-Lipoic Acid

Grape Seed Extract (200 milligrams per serving)

Grape seed extract is a substance derived from the ground-up seeds of red wine grapes that has long been used in European medicine because it contains a powerful antioxidant known as procyanidin B2.

Research shows that supplementation with grape seed extract . . .

  • Reduces the risk of heart disease[7][8]
  • Improves blood glucose control[9]
  • Enhances blood flow to the extremities, which can reduce the appearance of varicose veins[10]
  • May protect eye health[11]
  • May have anti-cancer activities[12][13][14]

The clinically effective dose of grape seed extract is between 75 and 300 milligrams.

Grape Seed Extract

Maca (500 milligrams per serving)

Maca is a plant native to Peru that has been cultivated for thousands of years for its root, which was an integral part of the diet and commerce of the ancient Incan civilization.

It contains several types of molecules known as alkaloids, which cause a number of positive effects in the body and are responsible for maca’s beneficial effects.

Research shows that supplementation with maca . . .

  • Improves subjective sense of well-being[15]
  • Improves sexual function in men and women[16]
  • Improves libido in men and women[17][18]
  • Helps preserve joint health[19]
  • Can reduce feelings of anxiety and nonclinical depression[20]

The clinically effective dose of maca extract is between 1 and 3 grams.

We chose to include 500 milligrams per serving because it’s enough to support sexual health and well-being but not so much as to produce an aphrodisiac effect, which, alongside tribulus terrestris, could be quite significant.

Maca

Tribulus Terrestris (500 milligrams per serving)

Tribulus terrestris is an herb that has long been used in Ayurvedic medicine to promote male sexual wellness, health, and virility.

It contains molecules known as saponins, which can mimic the effect of various steroid hormones in the body.

Studies show that tribulus terrestris doesn’t improve testosterone levels in men, as is often claimed, but interestingly, does support female sexual health and well-being.[21][22]

That’s why research shows that supplementation with tribulus terrestris benefits women experiencing diminished sex drive, including those experiencing menopause.[23][24]

The clinically effective dose of tribulus terrestris is between 500 and 750 milligrams, depending on saponin content.

Tribulus Terrestris

Vitex Agnus-Castus (63 milligrams per serving)

Vitex agnus-castus (also known as chasteberry) is a shrub native to the Mediterranean and Central Asia.

Research shows that supplementation with vitex agnus-castus alleviates and can even mostly eliminate side effects of menstruation including cramping, breast tenderness, headaches, anxiety, and irritability.[25][26][27][28][29]

The clinically effective dose of vitex agnus-castus is between 150 and 250 milligrams of dry fruit.

Triumph contains 63 milligrams of vitex agnus-castus extract (providing the equivalent of 250 milligrams of dry fruit) per serving.

Vitex Agnus-Castus

Olive Leaf Extract (80 milligrams per serving)

Olive leaf extract comes from the leaves of the olive plant, which has been used in European and Middle Eastern medicine for many centuries. It contains an antioxidant known as oleuropein, which can enter the mitochondria in cells and protect them against oxidative damage.

Research shows that supplementation with olive leaf extract improves the cholesterol profile and helps prevent age-related and oxidative-stress-related processes such as osteoporosis.[30][31][32]

The clinically effective dose of olive leaf extract is between 10 and 1,000 milligrams.

We chose to include 80 milligrams per serving because it’s all you need to reap most of the benefits that olive leaf extract has to offer.

Olive Leaf Extract

Coenzyme Q10 (120 milligrams per serving)

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a substance found in a wide variety of foods, but it’s particularly abundant in organ meats such as heart, liver, and kidney. It’s also in every cell of the body and functions as an antioxidant and helps with the production of cellular energy.

Research shows that supplementation with CoQ10 . . .

  • Improves heart health and function and reduces the risk of heart disease [33][34][35]
  • Protects sperm structure and function[36]
  • Reduces inflammation in the body[37]
  • Enhances the activity of antioxidant enzymes[38]
  • Reduces hypertension (high blood pressure)[39]

The clinically effective dose of CoQ10 is between 50 and 200 milligrams, with the majority of benefits seen at 90 milligrams.

Coenzyme Q10

Fucoxanthin (8 milligrams per serving)

Fucoxanthin is a vitamin A-like molecule known as a carotenoid, and it’s found primarily in brown seaweed. It enters cells and produces an effect known as uncoupling, which increases the energy requirements of mitochondria.

Research shows that supplementation with fucoxanthin . . .

  • May help with weight loss[40][41][42]
  • Inhibits the absorption of glucose into fat cells while augmenting its uptake into muscle cells[43][44]

The clinically effective dose of fucoxanthin is between 2.4 and 8 milligrams.

fucoxanthin

Zeaxanthin (6 milligrams per serving)

Zeaxanthin is a vitamin A-like molecule known as a carotenoid, and it’s found in egg yolks as well as a wide variety of plants and fruits. Like all carotenoids, it’s an antioxidant but is unique in that it can access areas of the body that others can’t, including the brain and eyes.

Research shows that supplementation with zeaxanthin improves eye function and preserves eye health.[45][46][47][48]

The clinically effective dose of zeaxanthin is between 4 and 8 milligrams.

Zeaxanthin

Lutein (6 milligrams per serving)

Lutein is a vitamin A-like molecule known as a carotenoid, and it’s found in a number of foods including broccoli, grapes, and squash. Like zeaxanthin, it’s unique in that it can access areas of the body that other antioxidants can’t, including the brain and eyes.

That’s why research shows that supplementation with lutein improves eye function and preserves eye health.[49][50][51][52][53]

The clinically effective dose of lutein is between 4 and 8 milligrams.

lutein

No Artificial Food Dyes or Other Chemical Junk

Studies show that artificial food dyes may cause negative effects in some people, including gastrointestinal toxicity and behavioral disorders.[54][55][56][57][58]

No Artificial Food Dyes or Other Chemical Junk

No Artificial Food Dyes or Other Chemical Junk

Lab Tested for Potency & Purity

Lab Tested for Potency & Purity

Lab Tested for Potency & Purity

Every bottle of Triumph is analyzed in a state-of-the-art ISO 17025 accredited lab to verify what is and isn’t in it. That way, you know exactly what you’re getting and putting into your body.

Triumph Female Lab Test Certificate

How to Use Triumph

Take 4 capsules, two times daily, with meals. For optimal results, take every day.

Supplement Facts

Customers Who Bought This Also Bought

Verified Customer Reviews

Frequently Asked Questions

What type of effects should I notice when I take Triumph?
8 caps per day!? Why, Mike, why!?
What does the Prop65 warning on the label mean?
Why are some ingredients in Triumph much higher than the RDI?
Is Triumph gluten-free?

+Scientific References

1. Decline in transcriptional activity of Nrf2 causes age-related loss of glutathione synthesis, which is reversible with lipoic acid.

Suh JH, Shenvi SV, Dixon BM, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004;101(10):3381-3386. doi:10.1073/pnas.0400282101.

2. Interplay between lipoic acid and glutathione in the protection against microsomal lipid peroxidation.

Bast A, Haenen GR. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1988;963(3):558-561. doi:10.1016/0005-2760(88)90326-8.

3. Decline in transcriptional activity of Nrf2 causes age-related loss of glutathione synthesis, which is reversible with lipoic acid.

Suh JH, Shenvi SV, Dixon BM, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004;101(10):3381-3386. doi:10.1073/pnas.0400282101.

4. Beneficial effects of creatine, CoQ10, and lipoic acid in mitochondrial disorders.

Rodriguez MC, MacDonald JR, Mahoney DJ, Parise G, Beal MF, Tarnopolsky MA. Muscle Nerve. 2007;35(2):235-242. doi:10.1002/mus.20688.

6. Effect of α-lipoic acid on symptoms and quality of life in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy.

Agathos E, Tentolouris A, Eleftheriadou I, et al. J Int Med Res. 2018;46(5):1779-1790. doi:10.1177/0300060518756540.

7. The polyphenol-rich extract from grape seeds inhibits platelet signaling pathways triggered by both proteolytic and non-proteolytic agonists.

Olas B, Wachowicz B, Stochmal A, Oleszek W. Platelets. 2012;23(4):282-289. doi:10.3109/09537104.2011.618562.

8. The effect of grape seed extract on cardiovascular risk markers: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Feringa HH, Laskey DA, Dickson JE, Coleman CI. J Am Diet Assoc. 2011;111(8):1173-1181. doi:10.1016/j.jada.2011.05.015.

9. Postprandial blood glucose response to grape seed extract in healthy participants: A pilot study.

Sapwarobol S, Adisakwattana S, Changpeng S, Ratanawachirin W, Tanruttanawong K, Boonyarit W. Pharmacogn Mag. 2012;8(31):192-196. doi:10.4103/0973-1296.99283.

10. Proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extract reduces leg swelling in healthy women during prolonged sitting.

Sano A, Tokutake S, Seo A. J Sci Food Agric. 2013;93(3):457-462. doi:10.1002/jsfa.5773.

11. Protective effect of grape seed extract against oxidative stress-induced cell death in a staurosporine-differentiated retinal ganglion cell line.

Yang H, Lee BK, Kook KH, Jung YS, Ahn J. Curr Eye Res. 2012;37(4):339-344. doi:10.3109/02713683.2011.645106.

12. Grape seed extract suppresses MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell migration and invasion.

Dinicola S, Pasqualato A, Cucina A, et al. Eur J Nutr. 2014;53(2):421-431. doi:10.1007/s00394-013-0542-6.

13. Gallic acid is an active component for the anticarcinogenic action of grape seed procyanidins in pancreatic cancer cells.

Cedó L, Castell-Auví A, Pallarès V, et al. Nutr Cancer. 2014;66(1):88-96. doi:10.1080/01635581.2014.851714.

14. Role of oxidative stress in cytotoxicity of grape seed extract in human bladder cancer cells.

Raina K, Tyagi A, Kumar D, Agarwal R, Agarwal C. Food Chem Toxicol. 2013;61:187-195. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2013.06.039.

15. Subjective Effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) Extract on Well-Being and Sexual Performances in Patients with Mild Erectile Dysfunction: A Randomised, Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

Zenico T, Cicero AF, Valmorri L, Mercuriali M, Bercovich E. Andrologia 41, no. 2 2009;41(2):95-99. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0272.2008.00892.x.

16. Beneficial effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) on psychological symptoms and measures of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women are not related to estrogen or androgen content.

Brooks NA, Wilcox G, Walker KZ, Ashton JF, Cox MB, Stojanovska L. Menopause. 2008;15(6):1157-1162. doi:10.1097/gme.0b013e3181732953.

17. Effect of Lepidium meyenii (MACA) on Sexual Desire and Its Absent Relationship with Serum Testosterone Levels in Adult Healthy Men.

Gonzales GF, Córdova A, Vega K, et al. Andrologia 34, no. 6 (2002): 367–72. doi: 10.1046/j.1439-0272.2002.00519.x.

18. A Double-Blind, Randomized, Pilot Dose-Finding Study of Maca Root (L. meyenii) for the Management of SSRI-Induced Sexual Dysfunction.

Dording CM, Fisher L, Papakostas G, et al. CNS Neurosci Ther. 2008;14(3):182-191. doi:10.1111/j.1755-5949.2008.00052.x.

19. The Chrondoprotective Actions of a Natural Product Are Associated with the Activation of IGF-1 Production by Human Chondrocytes Despite the Presence of IL-1β.

Miller MJ, Ahmed S, Bobrowski P, Haqqi TM. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2006;6:13. Published 2006 Apr 7. doi:10.1186/1472-6882-6-13.

20. Beneficial effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) on psychological symptoms and measures of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women are not related to estrogen or androgen content.

Brooks NA, Wilcox G, Walker KZ, Ashton JF, Cox MB, Stojanovska L. Menopause. 2008;15(6):1157-1162. doi:10.1097/gme.0b013e3181732953.

21. A systematic review on the herbal extract Tribulus terrestris and the roots of its putative aphrodisiac and performance enhancing effect.

Qureshi A, Naughton DP, Petroczi A. J Diet Suppl. 2014;11(1):64-79. doi:10.3109/19390211.2014.887602.

22. Tribulus terrestris for treatment of sexual dysfunction in women: randomized double-blind placebo - controlled study.

Akhtari E, Raisi F, Keshavarz M, et al. Daru. 2014;22(1):40. Published 2014 Apr 28. doi:10.1186/2008-2231-22-40.

23. Tribulus terrestris for treatment of sexual dysfunction in women: randomized double-blind placebo - controlled study.

Akhtari E, Raisi F, Keshavarz M, et al. Daru. 2014;22(1):40. Published 2014 Apr 28. doi:10.1186/2008-2231-22-40.

24. Assessment of the Effects of Tribulus Terrestris on Sexual Function of Menopausal Women.

Postigo S, Lima SM, Yamada SS, dos Reis BF, da Silva GM, Aoki T. Rev Bras Ginecol Obstet. 2016;38(3):140-146. doi:10.1055/s-0036-1571472.

25. Efficacy and safety of Vitex agnus-castus extract for treatment of premenstrual syndrome in Japanese patients: a prospective, open-label study.

Momoeda M, Sasaki H, Tagashira E, Ogishima M, Takano Y, Ochiai K. Adv Ther. 2014;31(3):362-373. doi:10.1007/s12325-014-0106-z.

26. Dose-dependent efficacy of the Vitex agnus castus extract Ze 440 in patients suffering from premenstrual syndrome.

Schellenberg R, Zimmermann C, Drewe J, Hoexter G, Zahner C. Phytomedicine. 2012;19(14):1325-1331. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2012.08.006.

27. Therapeutic effect of Vitex agnus castus in patients with premenstrual syndrome.

Zamani M, Neghab N, Torabian S. Acta Med Iran. 2012;50(2):101-106.

28. Treatment of moderate to severe premenstrual syndrome with Vitex agnus castus (BNO 1095) in Chinese women.

Ma L, Lin S, Chen R, Wang X. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2010;26(8):612-616. doi:10.3109/09513591003632126.

29. Treatment for premenstrual syndrome with Vitex agnus castus: A prospective, randomized, multi-center placebo controlled study in China.

He Z, Chen R, Zhou Y, et al. Maturitas. 2009;63(1):99-103. doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2009.01.006.

30. Postprandial LDL phenolic content and LDL oxidation are modulated by olive oil phenolic compounds in humans.

Covas MI, de la Torre K, Farré-Albaladejo M, et al. Free Radic Biol Med. 2006;40(4):608-616. doi:10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2005.09.027.

31. Antioxidant activity of olive polyphenols in humans: a review.

Raederstorff D. Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2009;79(3):152-165. doi:10.1024/0300-9831.79.3.152.

32. Bioavailability of phenolics from an oleuropein-rich olive (Olea europaea) leaf extract and its acute effect on plasma antioxidant status: comparison between pre- and postmenopausal women.

García-Villalba R, Larrosa M, Possemiers S, Tomás-Barberán FA, Espín JC. Eur J Nutr. 2014;53(4):1015-1027. doi:10.1007/s00394-013-0604-9.

33. Coenzyme Q(10) improves endothelial dysfunction of the brachial artery in Type II diabetes mellitus.

Watts GF, Playford DA, Croft KD, Ward NC, Mori TA, Burke V. Diabetologia. 2002;45(3):420-426. doi:10.1007/s00125-001-0760-y.

34. Coenzyme Q10 improves endothelial dysfunction in statin-treated type 2 diabetic patients.

Hamilton SJ, Chew GT, Watts GF. Diabetes Care. 2009;32(5):810-812. doi:10.2337/dc08-1736.

35. Effects of coenzyme Q(10) on LDL oxidation in vitro.

Ahmadvand H, Mabuchi H, Nohara A, Kobayahi J, Kawashiri MA. Acta Med Iran. 2013;51(1):12-18.

36. Protective effects of in vitro treatment with zinc, d-aspartate and coenzyme q10 on human sperm motility, lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation.

Talevi R, Barbato V, Fiorentino I, Braun S, Longobardi S, Gualtieri R. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2013;11:81. Published 2013 Aug 16. doi:10.1186/1477-7827-11-81.

39. Coenzyme Q10 in the treatment of hypertension: a meta-analysis of the clinical trials.

Rosenfeldt FL, Haas SJ, Krum H, et al. J Hum Hypertens. 2007;21(4):297-306. doi:10.1038/sj.jhh.1002138.

40. The effects of Xanthigen in the weight management of obese premenopausal women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and normal liver fat.

Abidov M, Ramazanov Z, Seifulla R, Grachev S. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2010;12(1):72-81. doi:10.1111/j.1463-1326.2009.01132.x.

41. Fucoxanthin from edible seaweed, Undaria pinnatifida, shows antiobesity effect through UCP1 expression in white adipose tissues.

Maeda H, Hosokawa M, Sashima T, Funayama K, Miyashita K. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2005;332(2):392-397. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.05.002.

42. Anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects of fucoxanthin on diet-induced obesity conditions in a murine model.

Maeda H, Hosokawa M, Sashima T, Murakami-Funayama K, Miyashita K. Mol Med Rep. 2009;2(6):897-902. doi:10.3892/mmr_00000189.

43. Fucoxanthin exerts differing effects on 3T3-L1 cells according to differentiation stage and inhibits glucose uptake in mature adipocytes.

Kang SI, Ko HC, Shin HS, et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2011;409(4):769-774. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2011.05.086.

44. Anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects of fucoxanthin on diet-induced obesity conditions in a murine model.

Maeda H, Hosokawa M, Sashima T, Murakami-Funayama K, Miyashita K. Mol Med Rep. 2009;2(6):897-902. doi:10.3892/mmr_00000189.

45. Long term effects of lutein, zeaxanthin and omega-3-LCPUFAs supplementation on optical density of macular pigment in AMD patients: the LUTEGA study.

Dawczynski J, Jentsch S, Schweitzer D, Hammer M, Lang GE, Strobel J. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2013;251(12):2711-2723. doi:10.1007/s00417-013-2376-6.

46. Secondary analyses of the effects of lutein/zeaxanthin on age-related macular degeneration progression: AREDS2 report No. 3.

Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) Research Group, Chew EY, Clemons TE, et al. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014;132(2):142-149. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2013.7376.

47. A dose-response meta-analysis of dietary lutein and zeaxanthin intake in relation to risk of age-related cataract.

Ma L, Hao ZX, Liu RR, Yu RB, Shi Q, Pan JP. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2014;252(1):63-70. doi:10.1007/s00417-013-2492-3.

48. Plasma lutein and zeaxanthin and the risk of age-related nuclear cataract among the elderly Finnish population.

Karppi J, Laukkanen JA, Kurl S. Br J Nutr. 2012;108(1):148-154. doi:10.1017/S0007114511005332.

50. Effect of lutein and zeaxanthin on macular pigment and visual function in patients with early age-related macular degeneration.

Ma L, Yan SF, Huang YM, et al. Ophthalmology. 2012;119(11):2290-2297. doi:10.1016/j.ophtha.2012.06.014.

51. Effect of lutein and zeaxanthin on macular pigment and visual function in patients with early age-related macular degeneration.

Berrow EJ, Bartlett HE, Eperjesi F, Gibson JM. Br J Nutr. 2013;109(11):2008-2014. doi:10.1017/S0007114512004187.

52. Dietary and lifestyle risk factors associated with age-related macular degeneration: a hospital based study.

Nidhi B, Mamatha BS, Padmaprabhu CA, Pallavi P, Vallikannan B. Indian J Ophthalmol. 2013;61(12):722-727. doi:10.4103/0301-4738.120218.

53. A dose-response meta-analysis of dietary lutein and zeaxanthin intake in relation to risk of age-related cataract.

Ma L, Hao ZX, Liu RR, Yu RB, Shi Q, Pan JP. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2014;252(1):63-70. doi:10.1007/s00417-013-2492-3.

54. Toxicological significance of azo dye metabolism by human intestinal microbiota.

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