Vitamin B Complex | Essential B Vitamins Supplement


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No, we don’t request you deliver it to a PO box in the Gobi Desert by carrier pigeon. Nor do we ask you to fill a cursed inkwell with orc’s blood and demon saliva and then use it to complete reams of return forms written in ancient Cyrillic script.

We just . . . wait for it . . . give you your money back. Holy moo cows. And that means you can say "yes" now and decide later.

Will Vitamin B Complex supercharge your energy levels and mood? No.

Will it instantly banish stress and boost fat burning? Absolutely not.

But can Vitamin B Complex support your metabolism, mood, cognition, digestion, and heart health? Yes. Or your money back.

And how can Vitamin B Complex do these things?

B vitamins are critical nutrients involved in the production of numerous enzymes and hormones in the body that regulate processes like cell growth and repair, brain and nervous system function, red blood cell production, protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism, and more.[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

Despite their importance, however, research shows that as many as 97% of people consume inadequate levels of one or more B vitamins for optimal health and performance.[16]

These “subclinical deficiencies” are serious, too—they’re associated with numerous health and performance problems, including mood disruption, impaired muscle function and recovery, fatigue, and more.[17][18][19][20][21]

Now, while it’s possible to get enough B vitamins to maintain health through diet alone, this can be difficult because . . .

  1. It requires eating several servings per day of foods that many people don’t eat regularly, including liver, seafood, eggs, dairy, legumes, leafy greens, and seeds.
  2. Fruit, vegetables, and grains often contain fewer B vitamins than they did in the past.[22][23]
  3. Processing and cooking can reduce the vitamin B content of foods by as much as 90%.[24][25][26]

Additionally, research suggests that the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for B vitamins is adequate for preventing deficiencies, but may not produce optimal health, longevity, and performance, which should be the ultimate goal.[27][28][29][30] This is particularly true for vegetarians and vegans, who often struggle to meet their body’s vitamin B needs through diet alone.[31][32]

There’s also reason to believe that people who are physically active have a greater need for B vitamins than sedentary folks, which can put them at an increased risk of developing an insufficiency.[33][34][35][36]

Thus, many health-conscious people who eat a nutritious diet also choose to supplement with B vitamins, especially if they’re physically active.

So order now. Try Vitamin B Complex risk-free, and see for yourself why we believe it’s the perfect vitamin B supplement.

Will Vitamin B Complex supercharge your energy levels and mood? No.

Will it instantly banish stress and boost fat burning? Absolutely not.

But can Vitamin B Complex support your metabolism, mood, cognition, digestion, and heart health? Yes. Or your money back.

And how can Vitamin B Complex do these things?

B vitamins are critical nutrients involved in the production of numerous enzymes and hormones in the body that regulate processes like cell growth and repair, brain and nervous system function, red blood cell production, protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism, and more.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8]

Despite their importance, however, research shows that as many as 97% of people consume inadequate levels of one or more B vitamins for optimal health and performance.[9]

These “subclinical deficiencies” are serious, too—they’re associated with numerous health and performance problems, including mood disruption, impaired muscle function and recovery, fatigue, and more.[10][11][12][13][14]

Now, while it’s possible to get enough B vitamins to maintain health through diet alone, this can be difficult because . . .

  1. It requires eating several servings per day of foods that many people don’t eat regularly, including liver, seafood, eggs, dairy, legumes, leafy greens, and seeds.
  2. Fruit, vegetables, and grains often contain fewer B vitamins than they did in the past.[15][16]
  3. Processing and cooking can reduce the vitamin B content of foods by as much as 90%.[17][18][19]

Additionally, research suggests that the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for B vitamins is adequate for preventing deficiencies, but may not produce optimal health, longevity, and performance, which should be the ultimate goal.[20][21][22][23] This is particularly true for vegetarians and vegans, who often struggle to meet their body’s vitamin B needs through diet alone.[24][25]

There’s also reason to believe that people who are physically active have a greater need for B vitamins than sedentary folks, which can put them at an increased risk of developing an insufficiency.[26][27][28][29]

Thus, many health-conscious people who eat a nutritious diet also choose to supplement with B vitamins, especially if they’re physically active.

Our Vitamin B Complex stands out because:

  • 115 peer-reviewed scientific studies support our Vitamin B Complex’s doses of B vitamins, choline, coenzyme Q10, and inositol[30] That’s 1,411 pages of scientific research that shows Vitamin B Complex works the way we say it does.
  • Contains no artificial fillers, food dyes, or other chemical junk[31] While these types of chemicals may not be as dangerous as some people claim, studies suggest that regular consumption of them may indeed be harmful to our health. And that’s why you won’t find them in Vitamin B Complex.
  • Analyzed for purity and potency in a state-of-the-art ISO 17025 accredited lab[32] Every bottle of Vitamin B Complex is guaranteed to provide exactly what the label claims and nothing else—no heavy metals, microbes, allergens, or other contaminants.
  • Total formulation transparency (no proprietary blends)[33] This means you know exactly what’s in every serving of Vitamin B Complex—every dose of every ingredient—and can verify the accuracy and efficacy of the formulation.
  • Made in the USA in NSF-certified and FDA-inspected and cGMP-compliant facilities

Vitamin B Complex is also backed by our “No Return Necessary” money-back guarantee that works like this:

If you don’t absolutely love Vitamin B Complex, just let us know, and we’ll give you a full refund on the spot. No forms or return necessary.

So order now. Try Vitamin B Complex risk-free, and see for yourself why we believe it’s the perfect vitamin B supplement.

Notice to California Consumers

WARNING: Consuming this product can expose you to chemicals including lead which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov/food.

Ingredients (685.6 milligrams per serving)

Vitamin B1 (15 milligrams per serving)

Vitamin B1 (thiamin) is a substance that plays a critical role in transforming food into energy and is needed for the growth, function, and repair of every cell in the body.

Vitamin B1 is also needed to complete a metabolic process known as the Krebs cycle, which is one of the primary ways the body generates ATP, the main “energy currency” of cells.[34][35][36][37]

Research shows that supplementation with vitamin B1 can . . .

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin B1 for adults is 1.1 to 1.4 mg per day. That said, studies show that exercise can increase your body’s need for vitamin B and that the RDA may not be sufficient for athletes to optimize health.[46] Some research has also shown that doses of B vitamins much higher than the RDA can provide additional health benefits.[47]

Vitamin B Complex contains 15 mg of vitamin B1.

Vitamin B2 (10 milligrams per serving)

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) is a substance required for the production of energy from food, cell growth and function, and the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, protein, ketones, and various other compounds.

For example, vitamin B2 is needed to create two essential coenzymes known as flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), which play a crucial role in the breakdown of food molecules for energy.[48][49]

Vitamin B2 is also needed to complete a metabolic process known as the Krebs cycle, which is one of the primary ways the body generates ATP, the main “energy currency” of cells.[50][51]

Research shows that supplementation with vitamin B2 can . . .

  • Support cognitive health, and may help protect against migraines[52][53]
  • Support the body’s natural antioxidant mechanisms[54][55]
  • Support skin, hair, and nail health and appearance[56][57]
  • Support the absorption of iron from food[58][59]

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin B2 is 1.3 mg per day for men and 1.1 mg per day for women. That said, studies show that exercise can increase your body’s need for vitamin B and that the RDA may not be sufficient for athletes to optimize health.[60] Some research has also shown that doses of B vitamins much higher than the RDA can provide additional health benefits.[61]

Vitamin B Complex contains 10 mg of vitamin B2.

Vitamin B3 (25 milligrams per serving)

Vitamin B3 (niacin) is a substance involved in hundreds of chemical reactions in the body, including the production of ATP from food, the building of new tissues, the production of antioxidants, and the regulation of cholesterol levels.[62]

For example, vitamin B3 is needed to create two essential coenzymes known as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP), which play a crucial role in the breakdown of food molecules for energy.[63]

Research shows that supplementation with vitamin B3 can . . .

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin B3 is 12 mg per day for men and 14 mg per day for women, and the upper limit is 35 mg per day for men and women. That said, studies show that exercise can increase your body’s need for vitamin B and that the RDA may not be sufficient for athletes to optimize health.[75] Some research has also shown that doses of B vitamins much higher than the RDA can provide additional health benefits.[76]

Vitamin B Complex contains 25 mg of vitamin B3.

Vitamin B5 (25 milligrams per serving)

Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) is a substance needed to create coenzyme A, which plays an essential role in digesting protein, carbs, and fats.[77][78]

Vitamin B5 is also needed to produce various stress hormones including cortisol, adrenaline, and norepinephrine, which help regulate heart rate, blood pressure, and blood glucose during times of physical or mental stress.[79][80]

Research shows that supplementation with vitamin B5 can . . .

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin B5 is 5 mg per day for men and women. That said, studies show that exercise can increase your body’s need for vitamin B and that the RDA may not be sufficient for athletes to optimize health.[91] Some research has also shown that doses of B vitamins much higher than the RDA can provide additional health benefits.[92]

Vitamin B Complex contains 25 mg of vitamin B5.

Vitamin B6 (10 milligrams per serving)

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is a substance that acts as a coenzyme in the body, assisting in the breakdown of protein, carbs, and fats.

It also plays an essential role in the creation of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, GABA, and norepinephrine, which heavily influence cognitive function and mood, and it supports immune cell growth and the production of antibodies, which helps your body fight off infection.[93][94][95][96]

Research shows that supplementation with vitamin B6 can . . .

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin B6 ranges between 1.3 to 1.7 mg per day depending on your age and sex, and the upper limit is 100 mg per day for men and women. That said, studies show that exercise can increase your body’s need for vitamin B and that the RDA may not be sufficient for athletes to optimize health.[104] Some research has also shown that doses of B vitamins much higher than the RDA can provide additional health benefits.[105]

Vitamin B Complex contains 10 mg of vitamin B6.

Vitamin B7 (100 micrograms per serving)

Vitamin B7 (biotin) is a substance used in the body to create five other enzymes, which assist in the breakdown of protein, carbs, fats, and the creation of fatty acids and glucose from other nutrients (gluconeogenesis).[106][107][108][109][110]

It plays a key role in regulating the expression of certain genes and cellular signaling involved in digestion and the creation of hair, nails, and skin.[111]

Research shows that supplementation with vitamin B7 can . . .

  • Support the digestion of carbs, protein, and fat[112][113][114]
  • Support skin, hair, and nail health and appearance[115][116]

Scientists still haven’t determined an exact recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin B7, but most research shows most people should consume at least 30 mcg per day to prevent deficiencies.

That said, studies show that exercise can increase your body’s need for vitamin B and that the RDA may not be sufficient for athletes to optimize health.[117] Some research has also shown that doses of B vitamins much higher than the RDA can provide additional health benefits.[118]

Vitamin B Complex contains 100 mcg of vitamin B7.

Vitamin B9 (400 micrograms per serving)

Vitamin B9 (folate) is a substance that assists in the creation of DNA and RNA, red blood cells, and neurotransmitters, and the breakdown of homocysteine, an amino acid that can be harmful in large amounts.

Vitamin B9 exists in two forms: folate, which is the naturally occuring form found in food, and folic acid, the synthetic version. While natural forms of vitamins are often better than their synthetic counterparts, this isn’t the case with folate, as research shows that folic acid (the form found in Vitamin B Complex) is absorbed almost twice as efficiently as folate found in food.[119][120]

Research shows that supplementation with vitamin B9 can . . .

  • Support the healthy replication of DNA and RNA and cell growth[121][122]
  • Support healthy heart and blood vessel function[123][124]
  • Support mood[125][126]

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin B9 is 400 mcg per day for men and women, and 600 mcg per day for pregnant women.

Vitamin B Complex contains 400 mcg of vitamin B9 (in the form of folic acid).

Vitamin B12 (100 micrograms per serving)

Vitamin B12 (methylcobalamin) is a substance that plays a vital role in the development and function of the brain and nerves, red blood cell production, bone health, the replication of DNA, and more.[127]

Research shows that supplementation with vitamin B12 can . . .

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin B12 2.4 mcg per day for men and women, and 2.8 mcg per day for pregnant women. That said, studies show that exercise can increase your body’s need for vitamin B and that the RDA may not be sufficient for athletes to optimize health.[138] Some research has also shown that doses of B vitamins much higher than the RDA can provide additional health benefits.[139]

Vitamin B Complex contains 100 mcg of vitamin B12.

Choline (250 milligrams per serving)

Choline is a nutrient that is vital for brain health and function and has very similar functions in the body as B vitamins.

Choline is needed to create the phospholipid membrane of cells, and as a result impacts cell signaling and integrity throughout the body.[140][141] It’s also needed to create the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which plays a key role in muscle contraction and memory.[142][143]

Research shows that supplementation with choline can . . .

While it’s possible to get sufficient choline through foods such as eggs, liver, and peanuts, research shows that up to 94% of women and 89% of men don’t consume the minimum amount of choline needed to support health.[150]

Scientists still haven’t determined an exact recommended daily allowance (RDA) for choline, but most research shows men should consume at least 550 mg per day and women should consume 425 mg per day for optimal health.

Vitamin B Complex contains 250 mg of choline.

Coenzyme Q10 (100 milligrams per serving)

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a substance found in every cell of the body that functions as an antioxidant and helps with the production of cellular energy.

CoQ10 occurs naturally in a wide variety of foods, but it’s particularly high in organ meats such as heart, liver, and kidney.

Research shows that supplementation with CoQ10 can . . .

  • Support heart health[151][152][153]
  • Support sperm structure and function[154]
  • Support healthy inflammation levels in the body[155]
  • Support the activity of antioxidant enzymes[156]
  • Support sprint performance and recovery[157][158][159]

The clinically effective dose of CoQ10 is between 50 and 200 mg per day, with the majority of benefits seen at 90 mg.

Vitamin B Complex contains 100 mg of CoQ10.

Inositol (250 milligrams per serving)

Inositol, sometimes called vitamin B8, refers to a group of molecules produced naturally in the body that are involved in cellular signaling and serve as structural components of the cell membrane.

Inositol may also work synergistically with choline in the body to support the function of cell membranes and create neurotransmitters, which is why they’re often taken together in equal amounts in studies.[160][161]

While it’s possible to get small amounts of inositol from foods such as citrus fruits, whole grains, beans, nuts, and green leafy vegetables, people who don’t eat these foods regularly will struggle to consume enough to support optimal health.

Research shows that supplementation with inositol can . . .

There is currently no established RDA for inositol, but the clinically effective dose when combined with choline is a ratio of 1:1 (equal parts inositol and choline).

Vitamin B Complex includes 250 mg of inositol.

No Artificial Food Dyes or Other Chemical Junk

As with artificial sweeteners, studies show that artificial food dyes may cause negative effects in some people, including gastrointestinal toxicity and behavioral disorders.[165][166][167][168][169]

That’s why we use natural coloring derived from fruits and other foods, as well as natural flavoring.

No Artificial Food Dyes or Other Chemical Junk

Lab Tested for Potency & Purity

Every bottle of Vitamin B Complex is analyzed in a state-of-the-art ISO 17025 accredited lab to verify what is and isn’t in it. That way, you know exactly what you’re getting and putting into your body.

Lab Tested for Potency & Purity

The #1 brand of all-natural sports supplements.

Over 4,000,000 bottles sold to over 800,000 customers who have left us over 45,000 5-star reviews.

Natural Ingredients
No Chemical Junk

Vitamin B Complex doesn’t just “contain natural ingredients”—every ingredient is naturally sourced. We don’t use artificial or synthetic substances of any kind.

Science-Backed Ingredients
Science-Backed Ingredients

Every ingredient in Vitamin B Complex is backed by peer-reviewed scientific research demonstrating clear benefits in healthy humans.

Clinically Effective Doses
Clinically Effective Ingredients & Doses

Every ingredient in Vitamin B Complex is included at clinically effective levels, which are the exact amounts shown to be safe and effective in peer-reviewed scientific research.

Lab Tested
Lab Tested

Vitamin B Complex is tested by third-party labs for heavy metals, microbes, allergens, and other contaminants to ensure it meets FDA purity standards.

Made in USA
Made in USA with Globally Sourced Ingredients

Vitamin B Complex is proudly made in America in NSF-certified and FDA-inspected facilities in accordance with the Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) regulations.

100% Money-Back-Guarantee
"No Return Necessary"
Money-Back Guarantee

If you don't absolutely love Vitamin B Complex, you get a prompt and courteous refund. No forms or returns necessary.

Trusted by scientists, doctors, and everyday fitness folk alike.

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Vitamin B Complex Lab Test

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I use Vitamin B Complex?
What makes Vitamin B Complex different from other vitamin B complex supplements on the market?
Can I take Vitamin B Complex with other Legion supplements?
A supplement I take already contains B vitamins. Can I benefit from Vitamin B Complex?
How much of the different B vitamins should I take per day? How much is too much?
What type of effects should I notice?
Can Vitamin B Complex be taken while pregnant or breastfeeding?
Can Vitamin B Complex be taken with medication?
Is Vitamin B Complex gluten-free? Soy-free? Dairy-free?
Is Vitamin B Complex vegetarian or vegan friendly?

+References

1. Office of Dietary Supplements - Biotin.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

2. Office of Dietary Supplements - Vitamin B12.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

3. Office of Dietary Supplements - Folate.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

4. Office of Dietary Supplements - Pantothenic Acid.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

5. Office of Dietary Supplements - Vitamin B6.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

6. Office of Dietary Supplements - Niacin.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

7. Office of Dietary Supplements - Riboflavin.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

8. Office of Dietary Supplements - Thiamin.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

9. What We Eat in America: Usual Nutrient Intake from Food, Beverages, and Dietary Supplements.

United States Department of Agriculture. Accessed May 10, 2023.

10. Thiamin, riboflavin and vitamin B6: impact of restricted intake on physical performance in man.

Beek EJV Der, Dokkum W Van, Wedel M, Schrijver J, Berg H Van Den. J Am Coll Nutr. 1994;13(6):629-640. doi:10.1080/07315724.1994.10718459.

11. Potential mental and physical benefits of supplementation with a high-dose, B-complex multivitamin/mineral supplement: What is the evidence?

Sarris J, Mehta B, Óvári V, Giménez IF. Nutr Hosp. 2021;38(6):1277-1286. doi:10.20960/NH.03631.

12. The effects of an oral multivitamin combination with calcium, magnesium, and zinc on psychological well-being in healthy young male volunteers: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

Carroll D, Ring C, Suter M, Willemsen G. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2000;150(2):220-225. doi:10.1007/S002130000406.

13. Effects of high-dose B vitamin complex with vitamin C and minerals on subjective mood and performance in healthy males.

Kennedy DO, Veasey R, Watson A, et al. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2010;211(1):55-68. doi:10.1007/S00213-010-1870-3.

15. Historical changes in the mineral content of fruit and vegetables in the UK from 1940 to 2019: a concern for human nutrition and agriculture.

Mayer AMB, Trenchard L, Rayns F. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2022;73(3):315-326. doi:10.1080/09637486.2021.1981831.

16. Changes in USDA Food Composition Data for 43 Garden Crops, 1950 to 1999.

Davis DR, Epp MD, Riordan HD, Davis DR. J Am Coll Nutr. 2004;23(6):669-682. doi:10.1080/07315724.2004.10719409.

17. Cooking losses of thiamin in food and its nutritional significance.

Kimura M, Itokawa Y, Fujiwara M. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). 1990;36 Suppl 1:S17-S24. doi:10.3177/JNSV.36.4-SUPPLEMENTI_S17.

18. The effect of cooking on the vitamin B6 content of foods.

Elmadfa, I., & Majchrzak, D. (1999). International Journal of Vitamin and Nutrition Research, 69(3), 184-187

19. A carotenoids in biofortified staple crops.

La Frano MR, de Moura FF, Boy E, Lönnerdal B, Burri BJ. Bioavailability of iron, zinc, and provitamin Nutr Rev. 2014;72(5):289-307. doi:10.1111/NURE.12108.

20. Potential mental and physical benefits of supplementation with a high-dose, B-complex multivitamin/mineral supplement: What is the evidence?

Sarris J, Mehta B, Óvári V, Giménez IF. Nutr Hosp. 2021;38(6):1277-1286. doi:10.20960/NH.03631.

21. The effects of an oral multivitamin combination with calcium, magnesium, and zinc on psychological well-being in healthy young male volunteers: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

Carroll D, Ring C, Suter M, Willemsen G. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2000;150(2):220-225. doi:10.1007/S002130000406.

22. Effects of high-dose B vitamin complex with vitamin C and minerals on subjective mood and performance in healthy males.

Kennedy DO, Veasey R, Watson A, et al. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2010;211(1):55-68. doi:10.1007/S00213-010-1870-3.

24. Serum concentrations of vitamin B12 and folate in British male omnivores, vegetarians and vegans: results from a cross-sectional analysis of the EPIC-Oxford cohort study.

Gilsing AMJ, Crowe FL, Lloyd-Wright Z, et al. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010;64(9):933-939. doi:10.1038/EJCN.2010.142.

25. Vegan diets: practical advice for athletes and exercisers.

Rogerson D. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2017;14(1). doi:10.1186/S12970-017-0192-9.

26. B-vitamins and exercise: does exercise alter requirements?

Woolf K, Manore MM. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2006;16(5):453-484. doi:10.1123/IJSNEM.16.5.453.

27. Vegan diets: practical advice for athletes and exercisers.

Rogerson D. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2017;14(1). doi:10.1186/S12970-017-0192-9.

28. Vitamin and mineral status: Effects on physical performance.

Lukaski HC. Nutrition. 2004;20(7-8):632-644. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2004.04.001.

29. ISSN exercise & sports nutrition review update: research & recommendations.

Kerksick CM, Wilborn CD, Roberts MD, et al. J Int Soc Sport Nutr 2018 151. 2018;15(1):1-57. doi:10.1186/S12970-018-0242-Y.

8. Office of Dietary Supplements - Biotin.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

9. Office of Dietary Supplements - Vitamin B12.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

10. Office of Dietary Supplements - Folate.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

11. Office of Dietary Supplements - Pantothenic Acid.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

12. Office of Dietary Supplements - Vitamin B6.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

13. Office of Dietary Supplements - Niacin.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

14. Office of Dietary Supplements - Riboflavin.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

15. Office of Dietary Supplements - Thiamin.

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed October 16, 2023.

16. What We Eat in America: Usual Nutrient Intake from Food, Beverages, and Dietary Supplements.

United States Department of Agriculture. Accessed May 10, 2023.

17. Thiamin, riboflavin and vitamin B6: impact of restricted intake on physical performance in man.

Beek EJV Der, Dokkum W Van, Wedel M, Schrijver J, Berg H Van Den. J Am Coll Nutr. 1994;13(6):629-640. doi:10.1080/07315724.1994.10718459.

18. Potential mental and physical benefits of supplementation with a high-dose, B-complex multivitamin/mineral supplement: What is the evidence?

Sarris J, Mehta B, Óvári V, Giménez IF. Nutr Hosp. 2021;38(6):1277-1286. doi:10.20960/NH.03631.

19. The effects of an oral multivitamin combination with calcium, magnesium, and zinc on psychological well-being in healthy young male volunteers: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

Carroll D, Ring C, Suter M, Willemsen G. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2000;150(2):220-225. doi:10.1007/S002130000406.

20. Effects of high-dose B vitamin complex with vitamin C and minerals on subjective mood and performance in healthy males.

Kennedy DO, Veasey R, Watson A, et al. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2010;211(1):55-68. doi:10.1007/S00213-010-1870-3.

22. Historical changes in the mineral content of fruit and vegetables in the UK from 1940 to 2019: a concern for human nutrition and agriculture.

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