Pulse | Pre-Workout

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Why International Bestselling Author Mike Matthews Created Pulse

Pulse is a 100% natural pre-workout drink that increases energy, improves mood, sharpens mental focus, increases strength and endurance, and reduces fatigue.

Do you sometimes lack the energy and motivation to get into the gym?

Do you sometimes want to hit the snooze button instead of the squat rack?

Are you sometimes just not able to give 100% in your workouts?

If so, Pulse is for you.

The reason it’s so effective is simple:

Every ingredient is backed by peer-reviewed scientific research and is included at clinically effective levels.

Pulse is also naturally sweetened and flavored and contains no artificial food dyes or other chemical junk.

So, if you want some help getting fired up, zeroed in, and ready to crush your workouts . . . you want to try Pulse today.

You won’t be disappointed.

In fact, if you don’t absolutely love Pulse, just let us know and we’ll give you a full refund on the spot. No form or return necessary.

You really can’t lose, so order now, and try Pulse risk-free and see if it’s for you.

Science-Backed Ingredients
Science-Backed Ingredients

Every ingredient in Pulse is backed by peer-reviewed scientific research demonstrating clear benefits.

Clinically Effective Doses
Clinically Effective Doses

Every ingredient is also included at clinically effective levels, which are the doses used in published scientific studies.

Naturally Sweetened & Flavored
Naturally Sweetened & Flavored

Every supplement is 100% naturally sweetened and flavored and contains no artificial food dyes or other chemical junk.

Lab Tested
Lab Tested

Every ingredient in every bottle of Pulse is tested for heavy metals, microbes, allergens, and other contaminants to ensure they meet FDA purity standards.

Made in USA
Made in the USA

Pulse is proudly made in America in NSF-certified and FDA-inspected manufacturing facilities.

100% Money-Back-Guarantee
100% Money-Back-Guarantee

If you don't absolutely love Pulse, just let us know, and you’ll get a prompt and courteous refund. No forms or returns necessary.

Ingredients (15.1 g per serving)

Caffeine (350 mg per serving)

Many of us can’t shake the cobwebs without our morning cup of coffee, but this powerful compound is a lot more than a mere pick-me-up.

Caffeine also boosts metabolism, improves strength, promotes muscle endurance, and enhances anaerobic performance.[1][2][3]

The clinically effective dose of caffeine for enhancing performance is between 3 and 6 milligrams per kilogram of body weight.[4]

Caffeine Caffeine

L-Theanine (350 mg per serving)

L-theanine is an amino acid found primarily in tea that’s responsible for some of its health benefits.

It helps balance the levels of two chemicals in the brain known as neurotransmitters (glutamate and GABA), which transmit nerve impulses.

That’s why research shows that supplementation with L-theanine . . .

  • Reduces the effects of mental stress[5]
  • Increases the production of nitric oxide, which improves blood flow[6]
  • When paired with caffeine, improves mood, memory performance, and attention[7][8][9][10]

The clinically effective dose of L-theanine when combined with caffeine is between a ratio of 1:1 and 2:1 theanine to caffeine, but as 2:1 may produce a calming effect, 1:1 is optimal for working out.

L-Theanine L-Theanine

Citrulline Malate (8 g per serving)

Citrulline malate is the amino acid L-citrulline bound with malic acid, a natural substance found in many fruits that is involved in the creation of cellular energy.

L-citrulline turns into another amino acid in the body known as L-arginine, which increases the production of a gas known as nitric oxide that widens blood vessels and improves blood flow.[11][12]

This is why research shows that supplementation with citrulline malate . . .

The clinically effective dose of citrulline malate is between 4 and 10 grams.

Citrulline Malate Citrulline Malate

CarnoSyn® Beta-Alanine (3.6 g per serving)

Beta-alanine is a naturally occurring amino acid that regulates the amount of the molecule carnosine that can be stored in the muscles.[19]

Carnosine reduces muscle acidity, which increases the amount of work that muscles can do before they become fatigued.[20]

This is why research shows that supplementation with beta-alanine . . .

The clinically effective dose of beta-alanine is between 2.6 and 6.4 grams.

We chose to include 3.6 grams of CarnoSyn® beta-alanine per serving because it provides significant performance benefits while also minimizing the common and harmless side effect of a mild prickling, itching, or tingling of the skin.[35]

CarnoSyn® Beta-Alanine CarnoSyn® Beta-Alanine

AlphaSize® Alpha-GPC (300 mg per serving)

Alpha-glycerophosphocholine (also known as alpha-GPC and glycerophosphocholine) is a compound that contains two molecules known as choline and glycerophosphate.

Choline is a nutrient that’s vital for brain health and function, and glycerophosphate is a substance that helps transport choline to the brain.

When ingested, alpha-GPC increases the activity of a chemical in the brain known as acetylcholine, which is used by nerves to communicate with each other, and provides the brain with glycerophosphate, which can improve its health and function.

This is why research shows that supplementation with alpha-GPC . . .

  • Increases power output[36]
  • Mitigates cognitive decline as we age[37]
  • Increases growth hormone levels[38]

The clinically effective dose of alpha-GPC is between 150 and 1,200 milligrams, with 250 to 500 milligrams sufficient for cognitive benefits and higher doses required for affecting dementia.[39]

We chose to include 300 milligrams of AlphaSize® alpha-GPC (50%) per serving because it’s enough to provide some benefit without eating up too much budget that we’d rather spend on other ingredients.

Furthermore, this dose reduces the likelihood of headaches in people who are using Pulse and Forge together, and especially in people who are using Pulse, Forge, and Ascend together.

AlphaSize® Alpha-GPC AlphaSize® Alpha-GPC

Betaine (2.5 g per serving)

Betaine (also known as trimethylglycine) is an amino acid found in various foods like beets (hence the name), spinach, and quinoa.

Betaine’s rich in a special molecule known as a methyl group, which is a vital component of many physiological functions, including DNA production, fat metabolism, cellular energy production, and more.

Betaine’s also an osmolyte, which is a substance that helps balance fluid levels inside and outside cells.

These two properties are beneficial during times of physical stress, and this is why studies show that betaine boosts muscle endurance and increases strength.[40][41]

The clinically effective dose of betaine is between 1.25 and 2.5 grams.

Betaine Betaine

100% Naturally Sweetened & Flavored

No Artificial Food Dyes or Other Chemical Junk

100% Naturally Sweetened & Flavored

While artificial sweeteners may not be as dangerous as some people claim, studies suggest that regular consumption of these chemicals may indeed be harmful to our health.[42][43][44][45][46][47]

That’s why we use the natural sweeteners stevia and erythritol instead. Studies show that these ingredients are not only safe but can also confer several health benefits, including better insulin sensitivity, a lower cholesterol profile, improved blood glucose control, potential anti-cancer effects, lower blood pressure and inflammation levels, and more.[48][49][50][51]

No Artificial Food Dyes or Other Chemical Junk

As with artificial sweeteners, studies show that artificial food dyes may cause negative effects in some people, including gastrointestinal toxicity and behavioral disorders.[52][53][54][55][56]

That’s why we use natural coloring derived from fruits and other foods, as well as natural flavoring.

No Artificial Food Dyes or Other Chemical Junk

No Artificial Food Dyes or Other Chemical Junk

Lab Tested for Potency & Purity

Lab Tested for Potency & Purity

Lab Tested for Potency & Purity

Every bottle of Pulse is analyzed in a state-of-the-art ISO 17025 accredited lab to verify what is and isn’t in it. That way, you know exactly what you’re getting and putting into your body.

Pulse Lab Test Page 1 Pulse Lab Test Page 2

How to Use Pulse

If this is your first time using Pulse, assess your individual tolerance by mixing 1 scoop with 10-12 ounces of water and consuming 15-30 minutes prior to exercise.

If you experience any non-optimum effects, stop and consult your doctor.

We recommend using 1 scoop 15-30 minutes prior to weight training or intense cardio, or 2 scoops (full clinical doses) for intense weight training or cardio lasting longer than 45 minutes.

Supplement Facts

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Directions

If this is your first time using PULSE, assess your individual tolerance by mixing 1 scoop with 10-12 ounces of water and consuming 15-30 minutes prior to exercise. If you experience any non-optimum effects, stop and consult your doctor. We recommend using 1 scoop 15-30 minutes prior to weight training or intense cardio, or 2 scoops (full clinical doses) for intense weight training or cardio lasting longer than 45 minutes.

Warning

Not intended for persons under the age of 18. Do not use if pregnant or nursing. Consult a health care professional prior to consumption if you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any prescription medication. Improper use of this product will not improve results and is potentially hazardous to a person's health. Use only as directed.

KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. STORE IN A COOL, DRY PLACE. DO NOT USE IF SAFETY SEAL IS BROKEN OR MISSING.

Frequently Asked Questions

How does Pulse compare to other popular pre-workouts?
What type of workouts is Pulse good for?
Is Pulse for men and women?
Pulse is too sweet/strong tasting for me. What should I do?
How many servings of Pulse can I take in one day?
What does the Prop65 warning on the label mean? Is the product still safe to use? Should I be concerned about it?
Is Pulse gluten-free, vegetarian, or vegan?

+Scientific References

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Astrup A, Toubro S, Cannon S, Hein P, Breum L, Madsen J. Am J Clin Nutr. 1990;51(5):759-767. doi:10.1093/ajcn/51.5.759.

2. Effect of caffeine ingestion on one-repetition maximum muscular strength.

Astorino TA, Rohmann RL, Firth K. Department of Kinesiology, CSU - San Marcos, San Marcos, CA. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2008 Jan;102(2):127-32.

3. The acute effects of a caffeine-containing supplement on strength, muscular endurance, and anaerobic capabilities.

Beck TW, Housh TJ, Schmidt RJ, Johnson GO, Housh DJ, Coburn JW, Malek MH. Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Human Performance Laboratory, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. J Strength Cond Res. 2006 Aug;20(3):506-10.

4. Effect of caffeine on sport-specific endurance performance: a systematic review.

Ganio MS, Klau JF, Casa DJ, Armstrong LE, Maresh CM. Department of Kinesiology, Human Performance Laboratory, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA. J Strength Cond Res. 2009 Jan;23(1):315-24.

5. L-Theanine reduces psychological and physiological stress responses.

Kimura K, Ozeki M, Juneja LR, Ohira H. Nagoya University Department of Psychology, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601, Japan. Biol Psychol. 2007 Jan;74(1):39-45.

6. L-theanine promotes nitric oxide production in endothelial cells through eNOS phosphorylation.

Siamwala JH, Dias PM, Majumder S, Joshi MK, Sinkar VP, Banerjee G, Chatterjee S. Vascular Biology Lab, AU-KBC Research Centre, Anna University, MIT Campus, Chennai, India. J Nutr Biochem. 2013 Mar;24(3):595-605.

7. Psychological effects of dietary components of tea: caffeine and L-theanine.

Bryan J. School of Psychology, University of South Australia, Adelaide, 5001, South Australia, Australia. Nutr Rev. 2008 Feb;66(2):82-90.

8. L-theanine and caffeine improve task switching but not intersensory attention or subjective alertness.

Einöther SJ, Martens VE, Rycroft JA, De Bruin EA. Sensation, Perception & Behaviour, Unilever R&D Vlaardingen, Vlaardingen, The Netherlands. Appetite. 2010 Apr;54(2):406-9.

9. The effects of L-theanine on alpha-band oscillatory brain activity during a visuo-spatial attention task.

Gomez-Ramirez M, Kelly SP, Montesi JL, Foxe JJ. Program in Cognitive Neuroscience and Schizophrenia, The Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory, Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA. Brain Topogr. 2009 Jun;22(1):44-51.

10. l-Theanine and caffeine improve target-specific attention to visual stimuli by decreasing mind wandering: a human functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

Kahathuduwa CN, Dhanasekara CS, Chin S-H, et al. Nutr Res. 2018;49:67-78. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2017.11.002.

11. Nitric oxide synthases: regulation and function (Articulo de revision).

Förstermann U, Sessa WC. Eur Heart J. 2012;33(7):829-837, 837a-837d. doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehr304.

12. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS.

Zhao Y, Vanhoutte PM, Leung SWS. J Pharmacol Sci. 2015;129(2):83-94. doi:10.1016/j.jphs.2015.09.002.

13. Citrulline malate enhances athletic anaerobic performance and relieves muscle soreness.

Pérez-Guisado J, Jakeman PM. Department of Medicine, University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain. J Strength Cond Res. 2010 May;24(5):1215-22.

14. Acute citrulline malate supplementation improves upper- and lower-body submaximal weightlifting exercise performance in resistance-trained females.

Glenn JM, Gray M, Wethington LN, Stone MS, Stewart RW, Moyen NE. Eur J Nutr. 2017;56(2):775-784. doi:10.1007/s00394-015-1124-6.

15. Acute citrulline-malate supplementation improves maximal strength and anaerobic power in female, masters athletes tennis players.

Glenn JM, Gray M, Jensen A, Stone MS, Vincenzo JL. Eur J Sport Sci. 2016;16(8):1095-1103. doi:10.1080/17461391.2016.1158321.

16. Citrulline malate enhances athletic anaerobic performance and relieves muscle soreness.

Pérez-Guisado J, Jakeman PM. Department of Medicine, University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain. J Strength Cond Res. 2010 May;24(5):1215-22.

17. Citrulline/malate promotes aerobic energy production in human exercising muscle.

Bendahan D, Mattei JP, Ghattas B, Confort-Gouny S, Le Guern ME, Cozzone PJ. Centre de Résonance Magnétique Biologique et Médicale, Faculté de Médecine de la Timone, France. Br J Sports Med. 2002 Aug;36(4):282-9.

18. Oral L-citrulline supplementation enhances cycling time trial performance in healthy trained men: Double-blind randomized placebo-controlled 2-way crossover study.

Suzuki T, Morita M, Kobayashi Y, Kamimura A. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2016;13:6. doi:10.1186/s12970-016-0117-z.

19. Influence of oral beta-alanine and L-histidine supplementation on the carnosine content of the gluteus medius.

Dunnett M, Harris RC. Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK. Equine Vet J Suppl. 1999 Jul;(30):499-504.

20. The biological role of carnosine and its possible applications in medicine.

Budzeń S, Rymaszewska J. Adv Clin Exp Med. 22(5):739-744.

21. beta-Alanine supplementation augments muscle carnosine content and attenuates fatigue during repeated isokinetic contraction bouts in trained sprinters.

Derave W, Ozdemir MS, Harris RC, Pottier A, Reyngoudt H, Koppo K, Wise JA, Achten E. Dept. of Movement and Sport Sciences, Ghent Univ, Belgium. J Appl Physiol. 2007 Nov;103(5):1736-43.

22. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on the onset of neuromuscular fatigue and ventilatory threshold in women.

Stout JR, Cramer JT, Zoeller RF, Torok D, Costa P, Hoffman JR, Harris RC, O'Kroy J. Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA. Amino Acids. 2007;32(3):381-6.

23. The effect of beta-alanine supplementation on neuromuscular fatigue in elderly (55-92 Years): a double-blind randomized study.

Stout JR, Graves BS, Smith AE, Hartman MJ, Cramer JT, Beck TW, Harris RC. Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2008 Nov 7;5:21.

24. Short-duration beta-alanine supplementation increases training volume and reduces subjective feelings of fatigue in college football players.

Hoffman JR, Ratamess NA, Faigenbaum AD, Ross R, Kang J, Stout JR, Wise JA. Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, USA. Nutr Res. 2008 Jan;28(1):31-5.

25. Influence of beta-alanine supplementation on skeletal muscle carnosine concentrations and high intensity cycling capacity.

Hill CA, Harris RC, Kim HJ, Harris BD, Sale C, Boobis LH, Kim CK, Wise JA. School of Sports, Exercise & Health Sciences, University of Chichester, Chichester, UK. Amino Acids. 2007 Feb;32(2):225-33.

26. Effect of β-alanine plus sodium bicarbonate on high-intensity cycling capacity.

Sale C, Saunders B, Hudson S, Wise JA, Harris RC, Sunderland CD. Biomedical, Life and Health Sciences Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Oct;43(10):1972-8.

27. Six weeks of high-intensity interval training with and without beta-alanine supplementation for improving cardiovascular fitness in women.

Walter AA, Smith AE, Kendall KL, Stout JR, Cramer JT. Biophysics Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA. J Strength Cond Res. 2010 May;24(5):1199-207.

28. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on endurance performance and body composition in men; a double-blind trial.

Smith AE, Walter AA, Graef JL, Kendall KL, Moon JR, Lockwood CM, Fukuda DH, Beck TW, Cramer JT, Stout JR. Metabolic and Body Composition Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2009 Feb 11;6:5.

29. Effects of β-alanine supplementation on exercise performance: a meta-analysis.

Hobson RM, Saunders B, Ball G, Harris RC, Sale C. Biomedical, Life and Health Sciences Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, UK. Amino Acids. 2012 Jul;43(1):25-37.

30. Effects of β-alanine supplementation on performance and body composition in collegiate wrestlers and football players.

Kern BD, Robinson TL. Human Performance and Physical Education Department, Adams State College, Alamosa, Colorado, USA. J Strength Cond Res. 2011 Jul;25(7):1804-15.

31. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on endurance performance and body composition in men; a double-blind trial.

Smith AE, Walter AA, Graef JL, Kendall KL, Moon JR, Lockwood CM, Fukuda DH, Beck TW, Cramer JT, Stout JR. Metabolic and Body Composition Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2009 Feb 11;6:5.

32. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on the onset of neuromuscular fatigue and ventilatory threshold in women.

Stout JR, Cramer JT, Zoeller RF, Torok D, Costa P, Hoffman JR, Harris RC, O'Kroy J. Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA. Amino Acids. 2007;32(3):381-6.

33. The effect of beta-alanine supplementation on neuromuscular fatigue in elderly (55-92 Years): a double-blind randomized study.

Stout JR, Graves BS, Smith AE, Hartman MJ, Cramer JT, Beck TW, Harris RC. Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2008 Nov 7;5:21.

34. Short-duration beta-alanine supplementation increases training volume and reduces subjective feelings of fatigue in college football players.

Hoffman JR, Ratamess NA, Faigenbaum AD, Ross R, Kang J, Stout JR, Wise JA. Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, USA. Nutr Res. 2008 Jan;28(1):31-5.

35. The effect of two β-alanine dosing strategies on 30-minute rowing performance: a randomized, controlled trial.

Beasley L, Smith L, Antonio J, Gordon D, Johnstone J, Roberts J. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2018 Dec 18;15(1):59. doi: 10.1186/s12970-018-0266-3.

36. Acute supplementation with alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine augments growth hormone response to, and peak force production during, resistance exercise.

Ziegenfuss T, Landis J, Hofheins J. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2008;5(Suppl 1):P15. doi:10.1186/1550-2783-5-S1-P15.

38. Glycerophosphocholine enhances growth hormone secretion and fat oxidation in young adults.

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40. The effects of chronic betaine supplementation on exercise performance, skeletal muscle oxygen saturation and associated biochemical parameters in resistance trained men.

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41. Ergogenic effects of betaine supplementation on strength and power performance.

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42. Splenda alters gut microflora and increases intestinal p-glycoprotein and cytochrome p-450 in male rats.

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43. What made Canada become a country with the highest incidence of inflammatory bowel disease: could sucralose be the culprit?

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44. Consumption of artificial sweetener- and sugar-containing soda and risk of lymphoma and leukemia in men and women.

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45. Fueling the obesity epidemic? Artificially sweetened beverage use and long-term weight gain.

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47. Gain weight by “going diet?” Artificial sweeteners and the neurobiology of sugar cravings.

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48. Steviol glycosides from Stevia: biosynthesis pathway review and their application in foods and medicine.

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49. Antioxidant, anti-diabetic and renal protective properties of Stevia rebaudiana.

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51. Effects of Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) extract and N-nitro-L-arginine on renal function and ultrastructure of kidney cells in experimental type 2 Diabetes.

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52. Toxicological significance of azo dye metabolism by human intestinal microbiota.

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53. Artificial food dyes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

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54. Meta-analysis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, restriction diet, and synthetic food color additives.

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55. Food additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

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56. Effect of food azo dye tartrazine on learning and memory functions in mice and rats, and the possible mechanisms involved.

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